Trustee chair's message

Kalyan Banerjee

Trustee Chair 2016-17

August 2016

More members mean a stronger Foundation

Our Rotary Foundation depends on a strong and thriving Rotary membership. It is, after all, our members who provide the generous support that enables our Foundation to tackle some of the world’s most pressing problems. As important as that support is, it’s not the only contribution Rotarians make to our Foundation.

The Rotary Foundation has an unusual business model. Like many charities, we receive donations that we use to address a host of critical issues. Unlike most other nonprofit organizations, we depend on our members to develop relevant and effective service projects. Your volunteer labor stretches our contribution dollars and helps The Rotary Foundation to do much more with less.

The typical global grant requires hours of planning and budgeting before even one dollar is received or spent. Then the sponsors must purchase supplies, seek donated goods, set up bank accounts, organize volunteers, write reports, and monitor the project’s progress, all while working with Rotarians in another part of the world. Fortunately, our clubs have a wide variety of professional skills and talents to call upon throughout this process.

Smaller clubs may not have the financial or human resources to sponsor a global grant, even if their members share a strong commitment to the Foundation’s mission. Imagine what those clubs could accomplish with two or three times as many members.

As we celebrate Membership and New Club Development Month in August, let’s not forget the importance of quickly engaging new members in Rotary service. Make sure they know about the many opportunities our Foundation offers members to pursue their service interests, from promoting better health to providing training and education to bringing peace and stability to communities in need.

Through The Rotary Foundation, our members have a chance to use their skills to make a real difference. First, we need to bring those talented people into our ranks and engage them in our Foundation’s vital work to create a better world. And only we, the Rotarians, can bring in those new members. So it is up to us, really, isn’t it?


July 2016

The start of a new Rotary year is always an exciting time. We have a new inspirational theme, new club officers, and exciting new projects to work on. In 2016-17, we also have a very special occasion to celebrate: the 100th anniversary of our Rotary Foundation.

Since 1917, when Arch Klumph proposed an endowment "for the purpose of doing good in the world," The Rotary Foundation has grown into a world-class humanitarian organization. Few other charitable foundations can claim a 100-year history – all the more impressive when you consider its humble beginning of only $26.50. The fact that our Foundation now has $1 billion in assets is a testament to the remarkable generosity of Rotarians worldwide. I often wonder just what our Foundation will look like when all Rotarians, everywhere, give it their sustained support.

I hope each of you will take the time to consider our Foundation's many successes, achievements we can all be proud of. Over the past century, we have provided $3 billion to tackle a wide range of problems, large and small, in thousands of communities worldwide. Our global and district grant projects are saving and transforming lives, and we are educating scholars and training professionals to carry on this vital legacy.

Our centennial offers an ideal opportunity to remind our members – and tell the rest of the world – about our Foundation's rich history of humanitarian work. It's time that everyone knew about our leading role in the battle to end polio, a fight that Bill Gates and others agree would never have been possible without Rotary's extraordinary dedication. Let's also spotlight the many ways we're fighting other devastating diseases, providing cleaner and safer drinking water, spreading education by promoting literacy, and helping local economies grow.

However you celebrate our Foundation's centennial, I hope you will make that celebration as public as possible. Hold an event that involves your entire community and showcases The Rotary Foundation's good work. You'll find many ideas for centennial celebrations at www.rotary.org/foundation100.

RI President John Germ's theme, Rotary Serving Humanity, speaks directly to the work of our Foundation, which for years has enabled Rotarians to embrace humanity and serve those in need. This year, let's commit to sharing those inspirational stories, just as we continue to write more and more of them.