Rotary clubs

Our clubs are the heart of Rotary. At weekly meetings, members catch up with friends, hear what’s happening in our communities, and share plans and exchange ideas for creating lasting change.

Your club connection gives you the chance to develop skills like public speaking, project management, and event planning. You’ll meet interesting people from your community and around the world. And you’ll tackle local and international issues that are important to you and your fellow club members.

E-clubs

If meeting at a brick and mortar location isn’t feasible, then a Rotary e-club might be right for you. Like other Rotary clubs, e-clubs meet weekly, carry out service projects, support The Rotary Foundation, and socialize. But instead of meeting in person, they connect through the Internet.

Learn more about Rotary e-clubs

Find a club

International connections

You can expand your club connections to the world by developing a twin club relationship, organizing a Friendship Exchange, joining a Rotarian Action Group or Rotary Fellowship, or hosting an Open World visit. With more than 34,000 Rotary clubs worldwide, you have a friend in Rotary wherever you go.

Twin clubs

Twin clubs, or sister clubs, are two clubs from different countries that form a long-term relationship to promote international understanding and goodwill and carry out service projects in their communities. When looking for a partner, consider clubs that:

  • Share similar interests, challenges, or history
  • You’ve worked with in the past
  • Are located in a place that matches your club’s service interests
  • Speak a common language

Browse projects seeking resources and consider partnering on a service project as a first step toward establishing a twin club relationship.

Recognize your relationship with a

Friendship Exchange

Explore new cultures and discover diverse perspectives by participating in a Friendship Exchange, Rotary’s international exchange program for Rotary members and their families. Not only will you help advance peace and international understanding, but your friendship can lead to future service projects.

Choose from the following types of exchange programs:

  • Visitor: Individual Rotary members and their families spend up to a week in a Rotary member’s home abroad.
  • Team: Several Rotary members or couples visit communities in the host area for up to one month.
  • Univocational: Rotary members who share the same profession see how their job is done in another country.
  • Volunteer/service: Rotary members take part in a service activity while visiting their host club.

Learn more in the Rotary Friendship Exchange Handbook

Find exchange partners through the Rotary Friendship Exchange Matching Board.

Questions? Email us at friendshipexchange@rotary.org.

Rotarian Action Groups

Connect with Rotary members, family members, and Rotaract members who are experts in a particular field by joining a Rotarian Action Group. Group members share their expertise by collaborating with clubs and districts on service projects.

Learn more 

Rotary Fellowships

Interested in scuba diving or marathon running? Want to use your skills as a doctor or environmentalist to make a difference? Share your hobby or vocation with fellow club members, their spouses, and Rotaractors. Some Rotary Fellowships are purely social, and others use their common interests and knowledge to carry out service projects.

Learn more 

Intercountry committee

An intercountry committee offers you the chance to work with Rotary clubs or districts in two or more countries. You might work with a committee to carry out international service projects, to sponsor a new Rotary club, or to develop a twin club relationship.

Learn more

Open World

Rotary clubs in the United States have a unique international and vocational service opportunity through Open World. In this federally sponsored program, clubs host a small delegation of current and future leaders from Russia, Serbia, or Ukraine. Clubs prepare a professional program related to U.S. business, community, and civic life.

These visits help develop a network of leaders who understand how American communities tackle contemporary issues. And the relationships they form often lead to service projects between Rotary clubs in two countries.

Questions? Email openworld@rotary.org.

Joining a club

Whether you’re a Rotary member looking for a new club, an alumnus wanting to reconnect with Rotary, or you know a person who would make a great club member, we can help you make that connection.

Interested in learning more about joining Rotary? Clubs accept new members by invitation, so we recommend first reaching out to one in your area.

Resources & reference